Mindset.Plus+ Method

Created by Rory M-J

Mindset.Plus+ is my trademark method of hypnotherapy developed from over 15 years’ experience working with the human mind.

It is a highly practical method of Advanced Hypnosis, drawing on first-hand learning from thousands of clinical sessions I have conducted. There is no over-complex theory, no blind adherence to prevailing conventional wisdom and no techniques that only really work when applied in the ‘bubble’ of the training room.

In creating this method, I followed the simplicity and efficiency of my SNAP concept – I kept what worked, discarded what didn’t and kept an open mind as to experimenting with new ideas and techniques.

I have always endeavoured to deliver my sessions within the holistic paradigm of ‘How do I best help this client to change?’ rather than ‘How do I as a hypnotherapist apply hypnotic techniques today?’.

As an independent practitioner, I’m therefore not wedded professionally or ideologically to any particular school of thought and this pragmatic method is designed to stay client and goal-focused at all times.

The ‘Long and Short’

By analysing the use of language in your ‘story’, I help you to define a new identity and supportive framework of personal metaphors that reflect the positive change you wish to make. This is then established at the conscious and subconscious level. The event that marks this change is referred to as your ‘Day 1’. We identify any potential obstacles to change on your road to success, whether internal or external, and work out ways to overcome them. Whether in-person and/or using hypnotic audios, this change is then further ‘brainwashed’ into becoming your reality. You then learn to live this reality, following your roadmap to success until the change becomes habitual or the paradigm of the ‘new normal’.

Rory M-J

1. Identity Shift

2. Roadmap to Success

I have found that change requires both an event and a path or road that is followed afterwards.

The event is the moment that defines the commitment to positive change. We are all constantly changing without even being aware of such changes happening. For example, the person who tries a hobby they loved as a child years later, but it just doesn’t appeal to them anymore. The change was only revealed when it was tested, but it had occurred earlier, below the level of conscious awareness.

Hypnotherapy, as with brief and rapid change therapy in general, provides an empowering way to decide upon the event that defines the positive change. I ask my clients to choose a ‘Day 1’ for asserting this shift in identity and to then commit to the behaviours that support the change. For in-person hypnotherapy, this Day 1 is usually the first breakthough appointment that includes hypnosis. For online clients, it is the first night and day using their tailored hypnotic audio.

However, for a change in direction to bring about lasting benefits, further signposting is required to continue the journey. The latter is what I term the roadmap for sustainable success, establishing the supportive behaviours that allow the change to become part of the client’s lifestyle rather than struggling against it.

‘Fail to plan and you plan to fail’ is very true in the field of rapid change, so I help all of my clients to establish their personal roadmap to success. This includes identifying any potential obstacles or barriers that may exist along the road and working out strategies to avoid or overcome them.

Obstacles to change can be both internal (those that require a shift in perception or thinking) or external (that require a behavioural strategy to overcome). Either way, this planning will allow the impact of any such obstacles to be reduced or eliminated. Then, as the days and weeks go by, the positive change becomes a habit in its own right, consciously experienced and subconsciously validated.

3. Subconscious Re-Programming

The use of hypnotic suggestion to bring about changes in thinking and behavioural responses at the deeper subconscious level.

There is broad consensus that hypnosis works to change the mind, but almost no agreement as to the exact mechanism of how it works. I have found the key factors behind the success of my sessions to be:

Sensory immersion – The use of technology to create a state conducive to the mind absorbing hypnotic suggestions. The specific goal is the attainment of the ‘Alpha State’, when brain wave activity slows down to between 7-14 HZ. In this state the mind is more open, receptive, creative and less critical – the perfect conditions to receive hypnotic suggestions!

Repetition – The use of repeated suggestions, including supraliminal suggestions and hypnotic language patterns, to prime the mind for change; plus the act of repeating the process through the use of hypnotic audios.

Tailored suggestions – Identifying and using the words, phrases and metaphors, personal to each individual, that will have most impact in reshaping their mind. This is combined with storytelling and ensuring the client has a supportive metaphorical framework for positive change.

Specific mental rehearsal – Imagining both the desired change and overcoming previously identified obstacles to it, during the safety of the hypnotic state, is one of the most powerful aspects of my method.

An overriding concept is that ‘what is learned, can be unlearned’. In this sense, I don’t shy away from what the process really is – brainwashing. This is what makes hypnotherapy so powerful – rapidly re-programming the mind through an intense, consensual form of positive brainwashing.

It can be argued that many of the problems faced when a person is trying to change have their basis in negative brainwashing – either from other people or the things we tell ourselves about ourselves, others and/or the world in general. These become the limiting beliefs that form the limiting identity that underpins the unwanted thoughts, behaviours and outcomes.

Most people looking for a positive change are usually already doing the negative version of brainwashing on themselves, i.e. they are giving themselves negative auto-suggestions that they can’t change, repeating this message in their language and self-talk and mentally rehearsing how attempts to change will fail.

This is why the initial change at the level of belief and identity is such an important foundation. With this in place, the positive suggestions can overwrite the negative to program in new thinking, behaviours and results.

Other Concepts

Change Not Treatment

For brief and rapid change therapy to be most effective, the focus must be on change not treatment.

Change is active and puts the client in the ‘driving seat’ of the process with the assistance of the therapist. In contrast, treatment is passive and can create a dynamic where a client simply has to turn up and expect the therapist to change them.

This is one way the traditional medical model for dealing with the human mind can be problematic – changing minds and fixing broken bones are very different. To have a broken arm reset, you simply have to turn up and receive the treatment. (That said, at some level, you still have to believe in the treatment or you wouldn’t consent to it!) To make changes in mindset and behaviour, you need to turn up, tune in, and be prepared to taking active steps to both think different and do different.

This higher level of personal responsibility is not for everyone and hence brief therapy is not for everyone. There are obviously also times when treatment is preferable, when a problem is so severe than an individual cannot cope with the level of responsibility described above. However, it is my belief that by working under a treatment paradigm, many practitioners inadvertently disempower and take agency away from their clients, placing them in a passive role when better results would be gained by empowering them to be active in the ‘driving seat’ of positive change.

Goal-Focused, Client-Focused

There should be a clear goal for what brief therapy is designed to achieve plus a target time period to see progress and results. Again, the goal itself is change so that should be the focus, not treatment with the hope, that at some point, change emerges as a by-product.

I believe in results, not activity. That is precisely why people usually choose brief therapy or hypnotherapy in the first place – they’ve often analysed, talked it through and now just want to move forward!

Therapy is also a business, but we must always be careful that the paradigms that suit the therapist do not impede the rate of progress of the client. I have found that weekly sessions are not the best fit for the majority of clients in the modern world, particularly when it comes to brief therapy. There is too little time to apply any of the homework tools and techniques, so sessions can become more of an obligation than an exciting opportunity for change.

Where required, there is typically a 10-28 day period between my sessions with clients, which I have found to be most effective.

Problems Not Symptoms

For any therapy to have the most positive impact it is important that it is targeted at the problem itself and not a symptom of a different problem.

For example, hypnotherapy to stop smoking cannabis is very effective provided the problem is primarily the habit of cannabis smoking. Of course, there are always other factors, for example using it to help sleep better, relieve boredom, etc. The key word here though is PRIMARILY. If the problem is mostly the habit itself, hypnotherapy targeted at this stands a great chance of success.

However, what if the cannabis smoking is PRIMARILY a symptom? (i.e. of another problem). An example might be someone using cannabis specifically to deal with flashbacks from a car accident in the past. In this case the hypnotherapy will have less effect if targeted at the symptom of smoking cannabis and not the real problem of recurring thoughts and images regarding the accident.

This brings up possibilities that a hypnotherapist must consider:

– that suggestions should be altered to target the real problem; – maybe hypnotherapy or brief therapy is not the best or only solution to the actual problem (it might also be outside the therapist’s scope of expertise) – Maybe therapy is not the answer at all! The solution may lie in a completely different approach or course(s) of action

Another drawback of the medical model when dealing with the mind is often being too symptom-focused. This is why I always try to see the big picture by asking my clients to ‘zoom out’ when analysing a problem in relation to their lives more generally. In this sense, Mindset. Plus+ endeavours to be holistic in the truest meaning of the word.

A significant part of this in my approach is ensuring client’s have an adequate amount of healthy ‘play’ – the subject of my book The Play Paradigm and a key factor in sustaining positive change and avoiding a range of problems that can hinder it.

Highs and Lows

The road to success in positive change will naturally have bumpy periods, good days and bad days. It is how an individual responds to these emotionally that often impacts on their ability to stay on track.

Sometimes, expectations of the nature and rate of positive change are the problem and this can be linked to an individual’s own levels of resilience. I help my clients to reframe their experience and to learn to be comfortable with the discomfort represented by any dips in progress in an otherwise upwards trend.

Another important reframe is the concept of ‘feedback not failure’, that a setback in progress is not a sign of being ‘back to square one’ (with all the unhelpful feelings of guilt, shame, anger and frustration that go with it!) Rather, it is an opportunity to LEARN.

I encourage my clients to quickly move on from the emotions of failure, to zoom out and ask ‘What went wrong and what could I do different next time?”

For example, someone having hypnotherapy to eat more healthily may have a day where, one afternoon, they go to a shop, buy chocolate and binge eat it. Rather than dwell on how “stupid” they feel or wondering have they failed, has the hypnotherapy failed, etc, it is better to look at what can be learned. Maybe this person ate an early dinner the night before and then skipped breakfast and lunch, they had a gruelling meeting at work and that was when they ’snapped’, at the point they were craving ANY sugar and possibly some reward / comfort.

What could they do different? Plan meal times better during the working week, or at least always ensure breakfast is not missed so they are not hungry and likely to make poor food choices later in the day. For the feeling of reward of comfort maybe they could have have their favourite show ready to watch on Netflix and on their break had a hot drink and watched part of an episode in the park.

In this way both conscious and subconscious mind can learn that diverting and returning back down the old path is NEVER the solution to the obstacles that appear on the road to success.

Art or Science?

I believe helping people to change their minds is better understood as an art, especially in relation to brief therapy. Scientific research and studies seeking to validate the effectiveness of different techniques are important. However, we must not lose track of how this practically translates, on a ‘local’ level, to an individual session between a client and therapist.

There is no better indicator of a failure to understand the nature of hypnotherapy as an art than an OVER-focus on declaring ‘evidence-based’, ‘science backed’, etc about a particular technique at every opportunity. All this often means is that the technique MIGHT, under certain research conditions, show SOME benefit, for whatever size sample group was chosen. Aside from sounding like they are selling shampoo, it certainly does NOT mean that a particular therapist will be able to apply the technique effectively.

My oven is ‘evidence based’ and ‘science backed’ to heat up food, but give it to my cat and I’ll be a long time waiting for dinner!

In practice, the art of successful hypnotherapy and brief therapy requires speed of thought and mental agility on the part of the therapist, which allows them to identify the key factors influencing the client’s ability to change. This allows them to be flexible and adaptable in the application of appropriate techniques and guidance, constantly recalibrating based on the feedback and data being received.

4. Supportive Thinking

The use of hypnotic suggestion to bring about changes in thinking and behavioural responses at the deeper subconscious level.

There is broad consensus that hypnosis works to change the mind, but almost no agreement as to the exact mechanism of how it works. I have found the key factors behind the success of my sessions to be:

Sensory immersion – The use of technology to create a state conducive to the mind absorbing hypnotic suggestions. The specific goal is the attainment of the ‘Alpha State’, when brain wave activity slows down to between 7-14 HZ. In this state the mind is more open, receptive, creative and less critical – the perfect conditions to receive hypnotic suggestions!

Repetition – The use of repeated suggestions, including supraliminal suggestions and hypnotic language patterns, to prime the mind for change; plus the act of repeating the process through the use of hypnotic audios.

Tailored suggestions – Identifying and using the words, phrases and metaphors, personal to each individual, that will have most impact in reshaping their mind. This is combined with storytelling and ensuring the client has a supportive metaphorical framework for positive change.

Specific mental rehearsal – Imagining both the desired change and overcoming previously identified obstacles to it, during the safety of the hypnotic state, is one of the most powerful aspects of my method.

An overriding concept is that ‘what is learned, can be unlearned’. In this sense, I don’t shy away from what the process really is – brainwashing. This is what makes hypnotherapy so powerful – rapidly re-programming the mind through an intense, consensual form of positive brainwashing.

It can be argued that many of the problems faced when a person is trying to change have their basis in negative brainwashing – either from other people or the things we tell ourselves about ourselves, others and/or the world in general. These become the limiting beliefs that form the limiting identity that underpins the unwanted thoughts, behaviours and outcomes.

Most people looking for a positive change are usually already doing the negative version of brainwashing on themselves, i.e. they are giving themselves negative auto-suggestions that they can’t change, repeating this message in their language and self-talk and mentally rehearsing how attempts to change will fail.

This is why the initial change at the level of belief and identity is such an important foundation. With this in place, the positive suggestions can overwrite the negative to program in new thinking, behaviours and results.

Mindset
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